Conversations: The Peace of Heaven

What are the differences between superficial peace, and real, lasting peace? How do we get them? A discussion with author Peter Rhodes about deep peace, Swedenborg, and life.

“Literature is my Utopia. Here I am not disenfranchised. No barrier of the senses shuts me out from the sweet, gracious discourses of my book friends. They talk to me without embarrassment or awkwardness.”
Helen KellerThe Story of My Life (via duttonbooks)

"We cannot see angels with our bodily eyes, only with the eyes of our spirit."

—Emanuel Swedenborg

  • Parent to child at the library: Shhh...remember what we said about being loud in the library?
  • Child: We'll wake up the books.
  • Parent: That's right.
“Explicit secunda pars summe fratris thome de aquino ordinis fratrum predicatorum, longissima, prolixissima, et tediosissima scribenti: Deo gratias, Deo gratias, et iterum Deo gratias.”
— Scribal colophon at the end of a (handwritten) fourteenth century manuscript. The translation: “Here ends the second part of the Summa of brother Thomas Aquinas of the Order of Preaching Friars, the longest, wordiest, and most tedious thing ever written: thank God, thank God, and again thank God.” (via magnicifent)

(via my-ear-trumpet)

"When we are doing good things out of love and kindness, our inner self is in heaven, in a community of angels who do the same kind of good things as we do."

—Emanuel Swedenborg

"The body does not do anything by itself; everything it does comes from the spirit inside it."

—Emanuel Swedenborg

exchangealumni:

You may know the story of Helen Keller, but have you read about Anne Sullivan, the teacher who helped Helen learn to live without limits?Born on this day in 1866 in Feeding Hills, Massachusetts, Anne was the eldest child of Thomas and Alice Sullivan, who emigrated from Ireland. When Anne was about 5 years old, she contracted trachoma, an eye disease caused by bacteria. Anne dealt with the effects of the disease, and vision loss, throughout her life. Around age 8, Anne’s mother died, and she and her brother were sent to live at Tewksbury Almshouse. On the day of the inspectors’ visit, Anne courageous approached the team and told them that she wanted to go to school. That moment changed her life. On October 7, 1880, Anne Sullivan entered the Perkins Institution, a school for those with impaired vision.At age 14, having never attended school, Anne didn’t initially fit in well at Perkins, but by the time she graduated, she was an academic star! In her Valedictory Address, she said: “Fellow-graduates: duty bids us go forth into active life. Let us go cheerfully, hopefully, and earnestly…” And did she ever! During the summer of 1886, Captain Keller of Alabama wrote to Perkins to inquire about a teacher for his young daughter Helen. The director of Perkins immediately thought the best candidate to teach Helen Keller: Anne Sullivan. The rest is history!

exchangealumni:

You may know the story of Helen Keller, but have you read about Anne Sullivan, the teacher who helped Helen learn to live without limits?

Born on this day in 1866 in Feeding Hills, Massachusetts, Anne was the eldest child of Thomas and Alice Sullivan, who emigrated from Ireland. When Anne was about 5 years old, she contracted trachoma, an eye disease caused by bacteria. Anne dealt with the effects of the disease, and vision loss, throughout her life. 

Around age 8, Anne’s mother died, and she and her brother were sent to live at Tewksbury Almshouse. On the day of the inspectors’ visit, Anne courageous approached the team and told them that she wanted to go to school. That moment changed her life. On October 7, 1880, Anne Sullivan entered the Perkins Institution, a school for those with impaired vision.

At age 14, having never attended school, Anne didn’t initially fit in well at Perkins, but by the time she graduated, she was an academic star! In her Valedictory Address, she said: “Fellow-graduates: duty bids us go forth into active life. Let us go cheerfully, hopefully, and earnestly…” And did she ever! 

During the summer of 1886, Captain Keller of Alabama wrote to Perkins to inquire about a teacher for his young daughter Helen. The director of Perkins immediately thought the best candidate to teach Helen Keller: Anne Sullivan. The rest is history!

"In the spiritual world, love is union. When everyone loves one another, there is harmony among many people…we become like one person, since nothing separates or divides us; everything unites us and helps us to work together."

—Emanuel Swedenborg

“Sometimes our fate resembles a fruit tree in winter. Who would think those branches would turn green again and blossom, but we hope it, we know it.”
— Johann Wolfgang von Goethe